Homicide

Who gets killed?

The answer to this question is crucial to understanding the struggles of battered women to survive their abusive relationships and to protect the safety of their children, family and friends.

Who did the killing?

This is also a critical question because it reminds us who is responsible for these deaths; bringing into sharp focus the relationships that batterers hijack for the final time when they transition from abusers to killers.


Shattered Lives: Homicides, Domestic Violence and Asian Families

The first national report of its kind analyzes clippings from newspapers and advocates for a 6 year period, 2000-2005.

Contents

  1. Types of Domestic Violence Related Homicides
  2. Intimate Partner Homicide
  3. Intimate Partner Homicide-Suicide
  4. Non-Intimate Family Killing
  5. Familicide and Familicide-suicide
  6. Other Domestic Violence Related Homicides
  7. Children
  8. Victims and Perpetrators
  9. Findings, Recommendations, Conclusion
  10. Key Findings

    • In a six-year period, 160 cases resulted in 226 fatalities, of which 72% were adult homicide victims, 10% were child homicide victims, and 18% were suicide deaths.
    • Three types of homicides dominated: intimate partner homicide with 81 cases, intimate partner homicide-suicide with 34 cases, and non-intimate family killing with 25 cases.
    • 78% of victims were women and girls, 20% were men and boys, 2% unknown.
    • 83% of perpetrators were men, 14% were women, 3% unknown.
    • 68% of victims were intimate partners (current, estranged, or ex-partners).
    • Almost one-third of total homicide victims were wives.
    • Children were the second largest group of homicide victims and the primary victims of familicides. Over two-thirds of all children killed were age 5 and below.
    • Perpetrators' in-laws and parents of girlfriends were the third largest group of victims.
    • 118 out of 184 victims were killed in the home.

    Fatalities: In a six-year period, 160 cases of domestic violence related homicides in API families resulted in 226 fatalities, of which 72% were adult homicide victims, 10% were child homicide victims, and 18% were suicide deaths.

    Types of Domestic Violence Related Homicides: Three types of homicides dominated: intimate partner homicide with 81 cases, intimate partner homicide-suicide with 34 cases, and non-intimate family killing with 25 cases.

    Gendered Killings: 78% of victims were women and girls, 20% were men and boys, 2% unknown. 83% of perpetrators were men, 14% were women, 3% unknown.

    Key Recommendations to Service Providers

    1. Use the findings to increase awareness of the problem and its gendered nature, and to discuss risks and safety with domestic violence survivors.
    2. Use danger assessment tools and discussions at several stages of the relationship to gauge risks; particularly before and after leaving an abuser.
    3. Assess danger to a victim’s family and friends, especially if they are providing emotional and other support.
    4. Develop safety plans for clients, children and extended family members.
    5. Address physical and psychological harms caused to children by injuries, exposure to homicide and suicide, and post-homicide custody battles.
    6. Educate family and community members to take victims’ stories and fears seriously.
    7. Improve identification of domestic violence related homicides so events such as mercy killings, car accidents, contract killings of immigrants in their home countries, and intimate homicide in same-sex couples are properly categorized as intimate killings.

    Key Recommendations to Researchers

    1. Integrate gender analysis into research on intimate homicide because this is not a gender-neutral issue.
    2. Analyze how domestic violence related homicides in Asian, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander families are similar or different from other communities and what this implies for intervention and prevention.
    3. Assess trauma of children exposed to homicides, homicide attempts/threats, and post-homicide custody disputes to inform policies that minimize custody battles.
    4. Carry out multi-variable analysis to identify characteristics such as age and gender of victims and perpetrators, to understand homicide risk and preventative factors.
    5. Investigate what distinguishes batterers who commit homicide from those who commit familicide.

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    Important Resources

    1. Danger Assessment Tool by Jacquelyn Campbell
    2. National Domestic Violence Fatality Review Initiative
    3. National Clearinghouse for the Defense of Battered Women
      • Annotated bibliographies by topic area
      • Resource library of 11,000 cases, articles and litigation materials
    4. Telling Amy’s Story A 60-minute documentary that follows the timeline of a domestic violence homicide.
    5. Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence

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    API Institute

    Contact Us for Technical Assistance & Questions

    The API Institute provides training and technical assistance on domestic violence-related homicides and familicides in Asian and Pacific Islander communities, Asian women who attempt familicide or mother-child suicide, honor killings, community organizing, trends, post-homicide child custody issues, fatality reviews, and other related topics.

    Send Us News Clippings

    Contribute to our research on cases of domestic violence-related homicides when either the victims or perpetrators are Asian, Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander. Please include information, such as, if victims are family members and/or friends in the U.S. or in home countries, the ethnicity of victims and perpetrators, or any additional relevant details.

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